Lions, and tigers, and giant jelly fish! Oh my!

This BBC video talks about how giant jelly fish are affecting Japan’s fishing industry.

This fascinates me for two reasons: (a) giant jelly fish are just cool and (b) it’s always interesting to see how human actions may be affecting the biological characteristics of an ecosystem. Yes, it sucks that the ecosystem is changing (for every species that thrives, there’s bound to be at least one that’s suffering) because of something we did (and don’t seem to be very committed to fix). But, it’s still fascinating to see the results. If nothing else, it might provide us with some clues about certain species. For example, seeing what plants survive and thrive in polluted areas gives scientist a clue about how they might work and what plants might be suitable to use in a land reclamation project.

Of course, it’s also ironic that over fishing may be part of why these giant jelly fish are surviving, and now they’re affecting the fishing industry. Maybe this is a case of karma biting back.

On a somewhat related note, this is a cool video that shows water movement around jelly fish as the pulsate. It’s meant to illustrate that marine life movement contributes to water mixing, but that’s a no brainer – a single swish of a whales tail moves a halla lotta water. Though, fish movement is only one small part of the equation. Under water earthquakes, rivers, movement of waters of different densities and temperatures all have a much greater affect on water mixing.

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